Archive for May, 2007

Lead, Follow or … Get Out of the Way!!!

Posted on May 30, 2007. Filed under: Quotes |

LEAD ………………………….. FOLLOW, or …………………………………………  GET OUT OF THE WAY !!!!!

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HEY!!!

Posted on May 30, 2007. Filed under: Light plus Weighty |

HEY,

YOU MUST BE DOIN GOOD –

‘CAUSE I NEVER HEAR FROM YOU !!!

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Launch

Posted on May 23, 2007. Filed under: Quotes |

Remember that the airplane takes off against the wind, not with it.
-Henry Ford

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John Kenneth Galbraith …

Posted on May 23, 2007. Filed under: American Thinkers, Business, Guide Posts, Light plus Weighty |

John Kenneth Galbraith was a liberal economist.  His books on economic topics were bestsellers in the 1950s and the 1960s. A prolific author he produced four dozen books – most famous was the trilogy, American Capitalism, The Affluent Society and The New Industial State. He taught at Harvard and was active in politics, serving in the administrations of Franklin D. Roosevelt, Harry S. Truman, John F. Kennedy and Lyndon B. Johnson. He was US Ambassador to India during the Indo Chinese War of ’62..

All of the great leaders have had one characteristic in common. It was the willingness to confront unequivocally the major anxiety of their people in their time.  This, and not much else, is the essence of leadership.

Money is a singular thing. It ranks with love as man’s greatest source of joy. And with death as his greatest source of anxiety. Over all history it has oppressed nearly all people in one of two ways:  either it has been abundant and very unreliable or reliable and very scarce.

Economics is a subject profoundly conducive to cliche, resonant with boredom. On few topics is an American audience so practiced in turning off its ears and minds. And none can say that the response is ill advised.

Economics is extremely useful as a form of employment for economists. In economics, the majority is always wrong.

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Adam Smith …

Posted on May 23, 2007. Filed under: Books, Business, Personalities, The Grand Scots |

Adam Smith was a pioneering  economist, famous for his ‘Wealth of Nations’. This book contains his explanation for rational self-interest and competition leading to common well-being. He helped create the discipline of economics and provided the best-known rationale for free trade and capitalism. Here are some of his maxims.

Man is an animal that makes bargains – he trucks, barters, exchanges one thing for another. No other animal does this – no dog exchanges bones with another.

Labour was the first price, the original purchase money that was paid for all things. It was not by gold or by silver, but by labour that all wealth of the world was originally purchased.

It is not from the benevolence of the butcher, the brewer, or the baker that we expect our dinner. It is from their regard to their own interest.

What can be added to the happiness of a man who is in health, out of debt, and has a clear conscience? Happiness never lays its finger on its pulse.

Humanity is the virtue of a woman, generosity that of a man.

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Alexis de Tocqueville on America …

Posted on May 22, 2007. Filed under: American Thinkers, Searching for Success, The French Contribution |

Alexis de Tocqueville was a French political thinker and historian best known for his book, ‘Democracy in America’  which was written on his return after travelling widely across America. He stands as an eminent representative of the liberal political tradition.

America is great because she is good. If America ceases to be good, America will cease to be great.

There is hardly a pioneer’s hut which does not contain a few odd volumes of Shakespeare. I remember reading the feudal drama of Henry V for the first time in a log cabin.

The Indian knew how to live without wants, to suffer without complaint, and to die singing.

As one digs deeper into the national character of the Americans, one sees that they have sought the value of everything in this world only in the answer to this single question: how much money will it bring in?

In no other country in the world is the love of property keener or more alert than in the United States, and nowhere else does the majority display less inclination toward doctrines which in any way threaten the way property is owned.

In the United States, the majority undertakes to supply a multitude of ready-made opinions for the use of individuals, who are thus relieved from the necessity of forming opinions of their own.

Consider any individual at any period of his life, and you will always find him preoccupied with fresh plans to increase his comfort.

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DESIDERATA …

Posted on May 15, 2007. Filed under: Great Writing, Light plus Weighty, Quotes |

Some say these lines of eternal wisdom, were found in Old Saint Paul’s Church, Baltimore, in late Sixteenth Century. Very very soothing of course but extremely hard to follow bar the truly Blessed. ……….

Go placidly amidst the noise and haste. And remember what peace there maybe in silence. As far as possible, without surrender, be on good terms with all persons.

Speak your truth quietly and clearly, and listen to others, even the dull and ignorant, for they too have their story. Avoid loud and aggressive persons – they are vexations to the spirit.

If you compare yourself with others, you may become vain and bitter. For always there will be greater and lesser persons than yourself.

Enjoy your achievements, as well as your plans. Keep interested in your own career, however humble. It is a real possession in the changing fortunes of time.

Exercise caution in your business affairs for the world is full of trickery. But let this not blind you to what virtue there is – many persons strive for high ideals and everywhere life is full of heroism.

Be yourself. Especially, do not feign affection. Neither be cynical about love. For in the face of all aridity and disenchantment, it is perennial as the grass.

Take kindly the counsel of the years, gracefully surrendering the things of youth.

Nurture strength of spirit to shield you in sudden misfortune. But do not distress yourself with imaginary misgivings. Many fears are born of fatigue and loneliness.

Beyond a wholesome discipline, be gentle with yourself. You are a child of the Universe – no less than the trees and the stars. You have a right to be here and whether or not, it is clear to you, no doubt the Universe is unfolding as it should.

Therefore, be at peace with God – whatever you conceive Him to be. And whatever your labors and aspirations, in the noisy confusion of life, keep peace with your soul.

With all its Sham, Drudgery and Broken Dreams, it still is a Beautiful World. Be Careful. Strive to be Happy.

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Lincoln’s letter re his son, to the Head Master of his old School

Posted on May 15, 2007. Filed under: American Thinkers, Great Writing, Guide Posts, Personalities |

(Abraham Lincoln’s letter to the Headmaster of his old School about his Son).

He will have to learn, I know, that all men are not just, all men are not true …  But teach him also that for every scoundrel, there is a hero; that for every selfish politician, there is a dedicated leader. Teach him that for every enemy, there is a friend.

It will take time, I know but teach him, if you can, that a dollar earned is of far more value than five found. Teach him to learn to lose and also to enjoy winning. Steer him away from envy; teach him, if you can, the value of quiet laughter.

Let him learn early that the bullies are the easiest to lick. Teach him, the wonder of books but also give him the quiet time to ponder the eternal mystery of birds in the sky, bees in the sun and flowers on a green hill side.

In school, teach him it is far more honorable to fail than to cheat. Teach him to have faith in his own ideas even if everyone tells him they are wrong. Teach him to be gentle with gentle people and tough with the tough. Try to give my son the strength not to follow the crowd when everyone is getting on the bandwagon.

Teach him to listen to all men; but teach him also to filter all he hears on a screen of truth and take on the good that comes through. Teach him, if you can, to laugh when he is sad. Teach him there is no shame in tears. Teach him to scoff at cynics and to beware of too much sweetness.

Teach him to sell his brawn and brain to the highest bidder but never to put a price tag on his heart and soul. Teach him to close his ears to a howling mob and to stand and fight, if he thinks it is right. Treat him gently but do not molly coddle him because only the test of fire makes true steel.

Let him have the courage to be impatient. Let him have the patience to be brave. Teach him always to have sublime faith in himself, because then he will always have sublime faith in mankind.

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Aims, GOALS …

Posted on May 14, 2007. Filed under: Guide Posts |

It is a paradoxical but profoundly true and important principle of life that the most likely way to reach a goal is to be aiming not at that goal itself but at some more ambitious goal beyond it.

Arnold Toynbee.

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Andy Warhol on ‘Not Doing It’

Posted on May 14, 2007. Filed under: Light plus Weighty, Personalities |

Being good in business is the most fascinating kind of art.
Making money is art and working is art and good business is the best art.

The most exciting attractions are between two opposites that never meet.

The most exciting thing is not doing it.
Control is exciting and, in the end, gives greater happiness.

Andy Warhol (1928 – 1987). American artist and central figure in the movement known as Pop art. Famous worldwide as painter, avant-garde filmmaker, record producer, author, and public figure known for his presence in wildly diverse social circles that included bohemian street people, distinguished intellectuals, Hollywood celebrities and wealthy aristocrats.

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